Skip to main content

About your Search

20130113
20130121
STATION
CSPAN 4
MSNBCW 4
CSPAN2 3
CNBC 1
FBC 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
MSNBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
the case be made for all women in a college environment? you have been the president of such a school. >> one of the things people think is a single sex school is all women. we have some male professors. the tilt is female, but we have male professors. they are not sitting in a convent. you have other school that are close by. so, none of these children or young people are being koiserred. it's an important point to make. a lot of them think they are going to be. however, i think there are lots of benefits. there are some disadvantages. there are 4,000 plus colleges in the united states. 4,000. you have clernlg colleges for african-american. 45 women's colleges. you have one founded for jewish people, why not variety? i didn't go to a single sex school. a lot of women who are achievers didn't. some want to make that choice. they want to learn and be focused. they want to have the opportunity to learn without the distraction of young men in the room and they are being prepared to go into a world with all the tools that make them unintimidated by men. they have learned how to argument.
the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concerns in that regard for the afghan people. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already in the -- called for the strategic partnership agreement between us and the united states have given their approval to this relationship and they value it as one that is good for afghanistan. so in that context the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve and i'm sure we will conduct it in detail where both the interests of the united states and the interests of afghanistan will be kept in mind. we had a number of other issues also to talk about. during our conversations and perhaps many times in that conversation beginning with the conversation of course i thanked the president for the help that the united states has given to the afghan people for all that we have gained in the past 10 years and that
the feds for smaller buy back to go forward to play it safe in a regulatory environment. sue, back to you. >> thank you very much. matt, covering goldman sachs and j.p. morgan for wells fargo. matt, first of all, let's go to j.p. morgan. how do you rate the stock and do today's rates change the way you feel about the stock? >> thanks, sue. we have an outperform rating on j.p. morgan today and we've had it for some time. we think today's results actually were, once you read through a number of the one-time items, relatively strong. we see a core return on tangible common equity in mid teens. and we think that the strong mortgage performance of the company as well as the relatively strong performance out of investment bank, good revenue performance, and as your previous reporter mentioned, preconference as well and that leads it a solid performance. relative to the peer group for the next six to 12 months. >> so matt, give mae choice between goldman sachs and j.p. morgan. i know they have fundamental differences between them, but if you have to buy one stock today, would it be j.p. morgan o
around policy uncertainty. there are many who believe that the uncertain environment that is prevalent in the nation's capital is adding to some of those concerns. we certainly hear from some of -- small-business customers and others who do not know what their tax rates are going to be or what areas the government may cut back on spending. it is a difficult position for people to wait in. even if they are seen profitability and growth in their business, they are trying to get by with what they haven't been rather than commit to -- with what a house rather than commit to new investments. >> you know how much of a world of participation rate is going to play in unemployment going forward? we have seen a sort of stabilization. will it hit the bottom? and have all of the we're factors played out and now it is just demographics? >> one dindane -- one thing that surprised everybody and one of the reasons we have had a lot of progress on the unemployment rate is past years we have not seen a lot of people re-enter the labour force. participation rates have been pretty much trending down. ther
, but making some judgments. you're going to have a consensus which is more typical of the urban environment. you're going to go into -- let's get back to laura. let's go back to bring the communities in and around or, colorado, what i think is an important conversation because i think you will find there is probably more consensus around the country for what we refer to as responsible common-sense gun legislation that complement's. we will also find in republican areas a lot of support for after-school programs. you will find a lot of that. so i think part of the way you get good at continuing that conversation, i would say that you dispel the cultural barriers. is very different to your reaction in montana. >> came to the staff to go fishing. as kid to my branch manager who is an avid outdoorsman and quite a political, owns a lot of guns but primarily traditional bow hunter. i said, rham emmanuel is coming. oh, my god. i've got to go hide my guns. and we left about this. they're going to love your guns. >> the secret service. >> the secret service came and they spend a lot of time. they ca
typical of the urban environment that you're going to go into -- let's go back to aurora. those covering communities around aurora, colorado that it is an important conversation because they're sore consensus around the country above refer to its gun legislation that complements other things. it was defined in republican areas a lot of support for afterschool. the further away you get in continuing the conversation i would say you dispel a breakdown of cultural barriers because there are differences, your ranch in montana. >> on came to my ranch to go fishing and i said to my ranch manager, who is an avid outdoorsman and quite apolitical, owns a lot of guns, but primarily a traditional bow hunter. i say trade when it's coming at us to the has chief of staff ms. brittany secret service detail within. said i've got to go make a spirit i said no, they are going to let their guns. the secret service came and spent a lot of time and came back on other occasions to go fishiness in the secret service had my ranch manager bonded over it. >> respect do not and i don't want to use your ranch incom
for silence and the environment host as forum on the disasters and environment. after remarks by fema director craig fugate, the lessons will focus on hurricane katrina, the ongoing drought and earthquake in japan on c-span 3 at 8:30 eastern. on c-span 2 at 9:00 a.m. eastern, a brookings institution conference on innovation and the economy. panelists in the day long event are scheduled to include the presidents and c.e.o.'s of alcoa, procter & gamble and nike. >> he had been talking about this dream he'd had. he talked about it for years, the american dream, and that it had become his dream and he had been in detroit just a few months before and he had talked about, you know, i have a dream that america will some day realize these principles and the declaration of independence. so i think he was just inspired by that moment. >> sunday on "after words" clayborn carson recalls his journey as a civil rights activist participating in the march on washington. it's part of three days of book tv this weekend, monday, featuring authors and books on the inauguration, president obama and martin luther k
environment, both parties are a little more subdued. republicans are panicky after two bad elections in a roam democrats don't have quite the same enthusiasm. but they're happy to be in their position. much better shape than republicans. >> heather: scott, you mentioned your marriage. four years in, you're still kind of a newly wed. you're still supposed to be excited about what is to come. how do the american people about this? we're headed into the second term for the president. are people optimistic? >> well, they're a little more optimistic than theygo. when the president first took office, 27% said the country was heading in the right direction. now it's up to 36%. on the day he was sworn in, four years ago, 35% said their finances were in good shape. it's up to 39% today. so progress, but people aren't really excited yet. there is still a lot of concerns to be dealt with. >> gregg: let's talk about the second amendment. you conducted a poll on that. what did you find? >> 65% of american voters, out of american adults, two out of three, say the reason we have a second amendment is so the
clear, natul sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) did you know, 94% of people who use lyric would recommend lyric to a friend or loved one. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call or visit trylyric.com for a risk--free 30--day trial offer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and brochure. why wait? hear today what a little lyric can do for you. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. charles: if you think your student loans are bad, china will now drop 250 billion dollars a year to send kids, millions of them, to universities. the goal is to have 195 million chinese college grads by the year 2020. but with the slowing economy, it seems they are going to have a whole lot of kids on their hands with big expectations and little opportunity. sounds familiar. let's get back to the markets. it's been a great year of the great migration, and what th
to keep control. he had to control the environment. he had to control the situation. and that, again, is so similar to madoff. >> sports is filled with cheating and everybody knows it, but there is an aspect of this story that oprah asked lance armstrong which is about in order to cover up, he told a lot of lies. that included emma o'reilly, armstrong's former masseuse. she said lance, quote, tried to make her life a living hell after she went public with some of the details of his doping operation. >> what do you want to say about emma o'reilly? >> hey, she -- she's one of these people that i have to apologize to. >> mm-hmm. >> she's one of these people that got run over, got bullied. >> yeah. isn't she -- you sued her. >> to be honest, oprah, we sued so many people, i'm sure we did. >> you're suing people and you know that they're telling the truth. what is that? >> it's -- it's a major flaw, and it's a guy who expected to get whatever he wanted and to control every outcome. it's inexcusable. and that's -- when i say that there are people that will hear this and will never forgive
regulated environment. so we take you quickly through a few studies that we've done that i think shows some very consistent patterns with firearms selzer accountability measures and the diversion of guns to criminals. the first one we published in 2009 was a study where we took the atf data from the 54 cities that had done comprehensive trace practices, had been in place in those cities. we looked at the state gun laws and we did a survey of state and local agencies to see what practices they engaged with respect to the oversight of licensed gun dealers and we did some regression analysis we control for a number of factors including other state done laws, gun ownership proxy's and the proximity to other states with weak gun laws. what we found is when you just looked at the states having strong gun dealer registrations by itself, it actually did not affect the diversion of guns to criminals. it was only having those in concert with a practicing those agencies of regulatory audit inspections and oversight of the dealers which i think it's quite interesting and important. we also found states
despite the fact they are working in this pernicious environment in washington. >> speaking of john boehner here, is another clip from inside obama's presidency with john boehner. >> dealing with the white house as i'm dealing with a bowl of -- like dealing with a bowl of jelge jello. they refuse to make tougher choices facing entitlement reform. that's the bottom line we are heading into the weekend with the best opportunity for preventing economic cataclysm on a global level from occurring it is now gone. there is month deal. >> it seems like barack obama and john boehner could do well to spend a couple hundred dollars and hire professional mediator. >> you know, it is probably something, as you know, much larger, much more proceed pound than that with implications, i'm now making a film about the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling that -- that will air in about a month. you know the scary thing about it, you guys, is the idea there may be government month by month as they pass resolutions and as this -- struggle continues. both sides really hunkering down, i think, for something t
proportionally because it was a real working-class environment which i grew up. so you didn't have mounds of food on your plate. and there were no snacks in our house. we didn't have potato chips or cookies. my mother would bake cookies once a week and then you'd have them as a treat. it was a whole different eating plan even though we were knocking back cokes all day long. >> with all due respect, i've heard this from joe, that's great that you ran all day. wonderful. that about the kids over the past 10, 20, 30 years who drank five cokes a day and didn't do that. >> is that coke's fault? that's the question. >> actually, it's part of a bigger problem just like the gun debate, okay? >> look, i have friends at coca-cola and friends at most of the soft drink companies. i think you've got to give them credit for at least putting this out there and saying obesity is an issue in america, and calories do count, and we're now talking about it as a result of them doing that. and it probably will generate some kind of a dialogue. >> i'll give them credit skeptically because i think they're covering thems
and it just -- being in the environment, it made me, you know, want to be more involved in the other aspects of my physical health. >> that's when you started getting into working out. is this book for mere mortals? we joke about it. we see you at "in the club." our results may very. you're pretty in shape. >> when they call me machine they're making fun of me. >> oh, they are? >> yes. the book is for the average person to -- person that's a little more advanced. there's two different programs in there. it's a six-week program. it has diet involved in it. a lot of times people get the training right and not implement the right diet and so they don't see the results they're actually looking for. >> a lot of people have notions about the rap lifestyle. not everyone immediately thinks this is the healthiest lifestyle. something you take on right away in the book. you write you might legitimately ask, who are you to preach fitness? aren't you the guy who dropped joints like high all the time? >> comfortable with that fitness and everything else i wrote in the album, all the dysfunctional behavio
after the fact, social services, an unsafe environment, but that does not get at the issue. they have to be creative sometimes to do that. in regards to domestic violence, absolutely. here is what we can do. forgive me for saying the obvious, ncic is a wonderful thing. anything with a serial number goes in there, like a toaster. it is not necessarily a go to database to get what we want to get at. i think you are right on. those people should go into the next system right away. what we need is funding for crisis teams. a lot of times, someone needs help and an officer rolls up at 3:00 in the morning and they are very limited in the resources available to them. if there is funding for properly trained crisis intervention people, there we go. now we have got something. now it is the mental health e r and the offices do not have to try to be creative or drive away because there is nothing they can do. was there another question? >> i wanted to add one thing. i am not an expert in mental health. i just want to say in any comprehensive package, including appropriate funding for increased a
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)